Skip to content
Home » Peter Lorre

Peter Lorre

Mad Love

Mad Love

  • by

Mad Love (1935), starring Peter Lorre, Frances Drake, Colin Clive

Mad Love What will obsessed surgeon Dr. Gogol do to be with lovely Yvonne Orlac … When her pianist husband’s hands are crushed? How far will he go…

Read More »Mad Love

You’ll Find Out

  • by

You’ll Find Out (1940), starring Kay Kyser, Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Peter Lorre

Synopsis of You’ll Find Out

In You’ll Find Out, famous band leader Kay Kyser and his group go to a scary old mansion where they encounter a ghostly seance, a murder plot, Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, and Peter Lorre! It’s spooky fun for all in this ultra rare classic from 1940!

Read More »You’ll Find Out

Stranger on the Third Floor

  • by

Stranger on the Third Floor (1940) starring Peter Lorre, John McGuire, Margaret Tallichet, Elisha Cook Jr.

In The Stranger on the Third Floor, an aspiring journalist testifies that he saw a young man at the scene of a brutal killing. The man is sentenced to death. The journalist worries that he’s responsible for the death of an innocent man. He begins his own investigation with his girlfriend. But they soon find themselves threatened by a mysterious stranger …

Read More »Stranger on the Third Floor

Tales of Terror

  • by

Tales of Terror (1962) starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone, Joyce Jameson by Roger Corman

Synopsis

Tales of Terror is a trio of Poe horror tales, directed by Rober Corman. Based on: The Black Cat, The Cask of Amontillado, Morella, and The case of M. Valdemar.

Read More »Tales of Terror

The Comedy of Terrors

  • by

The Comedy of Terrors (1963), starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff, Basil Rathbone, Joyce Jameson

Synopsis of The Comedy of Terrors

The Comedy of Terrors is a hilarious horror spoof.  A funeral director, who is in arrears on his rent, aggressively pursues customers to bolster his business …  And the fact that they haven’t died yet doesn’t bother him at all!

Read More »The Comedy of Terrors

The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre

  • by

The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre

Editorial review of The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre courtesy of Amazon.com

Often typecast as a menacing figure, Peter Lorre achieved Hollywood fame first as a featured player and later as a character actor, trademarking his screen performances with a delicately strung balance between good and evil. His portrayal of the child murderer in Fritz Langs masterpiece M (1931) catapulted him to international fame. Lang said of Lorre: He gave one of the best performances in film history and certainly the best in his life. Today, the Hungarian-born actor is also recognized for his riveting performances in The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The Maltese Falcon (1941), and Casablanca (1942). Lorre arrived in America in 1934 expecting to shed his screen image as a villain. He even tried to lose his signature accent, but Hollywood repeatedly cast him as an outsider who hinted at things better left unknown.

Read More »The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre

The Raven

  • by

The Raven (1963) starring Vincent Price, Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, Jack Nicholson, Hazel Court

In short,  The Raven is one of the funniest movies that I’ve ever seen, in any genre. It has some truly scary moments as well, and gives some of the best horror actors of all time — Vincent Price, Boris Karloff, and Peter Lorre — room to work, and they do so wonderfully.

The movie is ever-so-loosely based on Edgar Allen Poe’s classic poem, The Raven. And, in fact, Vincent Price plays the part of Dr. Erasmus Craven, the previously-unnamed narrator of the poem, who is mourning for his lost wife, Lanore (played by the beautiful and talented Hazel Court) — although his daughter Estelle (played by Olive Sturgess) tries to comfort him, he turns inward, and away from the world, a virtual recluse — until he gets a visit from the titular raven. A talking raven …

Read More »The Raven

M – Peter Lorre, Fritz Lang

  • by

M (1931) directed by Fritz Lang, starring Peter Lorre

I’ve known for a long time that Fritz Lang was a ground-breaking movie director (Metropolis for example)–but I’ve never truly appreciated that for myself, until I recently saw his black and white movie about a search for a child murderer, titled M.  Fritz Lang described M as a documentary, and I would have to agree with that–it looks, and feels, like a documentary.  

Read More »M – Peter Lorre, Fritz Lang
Exit mobile version