Home » Musical » In Person [Ginger Rogers]

In Person [Ginger Rogers]

In Person (1935) starring Ginger Rogers, George Brent

Synopsis

In Person is the story of Miss Carol Corliss, a beautiful movie star so insecure about her fame, that she goes around in disguise. She later meets a rugged outdoorsman who is unaffected by her star status. And pursued by her frequent co-star, who likes her. But doesn’t respect her acting ability.

Editorial review of In Person courtesy of Amazon.com

After suffering a nervous breakdown (at least that’s what she calls it), imperious movie star Carol Corliss (Ginger Rogers) retreats to a small mountain resort community to recuperate. Carol proceeds to adopt a series of ridiculous disguises so she won’t be bothered by her fans, only to realize that she misses being bothered. She also tangles with chauvinistic local sportsman Emory Muir (George Brent), who’s convinced that Carol is one shrew who is worth taming. In Person was released after the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers vehicle Top Hat, but filmed earlier; even so, Rogers performs a pair of dance routines choreographed by future Top Hat associate Hermes Pan, and as a bonus sings a trio of songs co-written by Oscar Levant and Dorothy Fields. Fans of the Three Stooges will recognize comedy-foil Bud Jamison as a disgruntled (and non-speaking) elevator passenger in the film’s opening scene. …In Person

Cast of characters

  • Carol Corliss (Ginger Rogers, Roxie Hart, Top Hat). A movie star, who’s become afraid of the constant attention that she results to (silly) disguises to walk among ordinary people. But then, she craves it. And her doctor sends her to a mountain resort to recuperate from her “nervous breakdown”.
  • Emory Muir (George Brent, 42nd Street, Jezebel). The chauvinist sportsman whom starts falling in love with her at the resort
  • Dr. Aaron Sylvester (Samuel S. Hinds, It’s a Wonderful Life, You Can’t Take It With You). Carol’s doctor, with the common sense that she desperately needs.
  • Jay Holmes (Alan Mowbray, The Man Who Knew Too Much 1956, Topper). Carol’s frequent co-star, who doesn’t respect her acting ability. But she’s beautiful, and he thinks he’s in love with her.

Songs

  • Lovely To Look At, Music by Jerome Kern, Lyrics by Dorothy Fields and Jimmy McHugh
  • Don’t Mention Love to Me, Music by Oscar Levant, Lyrics by Dorothy Fields, Sung by Ginger Rogers
  • Got a New Lease on Life, Music by Oscar Levant, Lyrics by Dorothy Fields, Sung and Danced by Ginger Rogers
  • Out of Sight, Out of Mind, Music by Oscar Levant, Lyrics by Dorothy Fields, Danced by Ginger Rogers

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